Translate

Category Archive Uncategorized

Worried about breast cancer after the sad news about Sarah Harding?

If you are feeling worried or anxious about breast cancer after the sad news about Sarah Harding, there is support and advice available for you.

Breast Cancer Now have nurses available to answer your questions via their free Helpline 0808 800 6000 or you can find out more about signs and symptoms on their website https://breastcancernow.org/…/signs-symptoms-breast-cancer

You can also find advice at: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/breast-cancer/symptoms/

If you notice any symptoms of breast cancer, such as an unusual lump in your breast or any change in the appearance, feel or shape of your breasts book an appointment to see your GP asap.

The GP will examine you. If they think your symptoms need further assessment, they’ll refer you to a specialist breast cancer clinic.

Migraine Awareness Week

This week is Migraine Awareness Week and aims to raise awareness of the condition and highlight the impact it has to people living with it.

A migraine is usually a moderate or severe headache felt as a throbbing pain on one side of the head. Many people have symptoms such as nausea, vomiting and increased sensitivity to light or sound.

Migraine is a common health condition affecting around one in every five women and around one in every 15 men. They usually begin in early adulthood.

Simple painkillers such as Paracetamol or Ibuprofen can be effective for migraine. However, be careful not to take too many painkillers as this could make it harder to treat headaches over time.

You should make an appointment to see your GP if you have frequent migraines (on more than five days a month), even if they can be controlled with medication, as you may benefit from preventative treatment.

More information on migraines can be found at https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/migraine/

In this together!

We want to ensure that our GP practices are safe places for everyone – that is our absolute priority and we ask that you do all you can to help us help you. Everybody needs to continue to act carefully and we thank you for your support – we’re #inthistogether. Watch this short film put together by Cheshire CCG featuring Tina Birkby a local Practice Manager and local GP, Dr Judi Price reinforcing the need to continue to stay safe and the ways that people will access general practice for the foreseeable future.

Childhood Respiratory Conditions

Dr Ravi Jayaram has teamed up with Cheshire CCG and created a short video explaining the rise in respiratory conditions in young children and what parents should be on the lookout for! To watch the video

CATCH App – a useful tool for anyone looking after little ones

Cheshire CCG have developed the CATCH app, a very useful tool for anyone looking after little ones.  It contains useful information about emergency care for children, services available in the local area and information on routine care such as immunizations and medication. Get it wherever you get your apps

Data Protection – Your Personal Data is Safe

We are aware that recent events highlighted in the media concerning sharing your personal data may have left you confused and worried.

This has led to a rise in the number of queries asking us who we actually share your personal data with, do we have the rights to and can we trust these external organisations to look after your personal data.

We would like to assure you that as a practice we take your personal data very seriously and we have certain processes in place to make sure your personal data is in safe hands at all times.

As a practice we must adhere to UK Data Protection laws, the UK General Data Protection Regulation (UK GDPR) and the Data Protection Act 2018, both pieces of legislation are around to make sure we look after your data. Where we do not follow any part of the Data Protection laws we are at risk of being investigated by the Information Commissioner’s Officer (ICO) on your behalf, and possibly being issued with a fine or warning. The ICO is an independent advisory body who report directly to Parliament and make sure your rights around your personal data are protected.

To help us keep on track and make sure we abide by these laws we complete something called the Data Security and Protection Toolkit (DSPT) that incorporates the laws. It helps us measure how we are doing and keeps us in line with the law and we are required to complete this annually.

There will be times when we have to share your personal data with external organisations / companies in order to provide you with the care you need. However, we only do this where we need to, where we have a legal reason to do so and when we are happy they will continue to safeguard your personal data. An example would be the Clinical IT system we use that holds your medical records, this is supplied by an IT company who will host your personal data to enable us to use the system. 

In any event where we share your personal data we will conduct the necessary Data Protection checks with the external organisation. Like us, they are required by data protection law to provide us with relevant assurances that any personal data we share with them will remain secure. Under the UK GDPR they are required to provide us with documents to assure us and this will include contracts which must include UK GDPR clauses. If an organisation does not process your personal data in line with law they too will be investigated by the ICO. 

We cannot share your personal data without a legal basis, which means we cannot give your personal data to anyone ‘just because’ they want it. The UK GDPR sets out 6 legal bases we can use, the most common one you would have heard of is ‘consent.’ Consent is not often used in healthcare and where we are using your personal data for direct care, it just would not work and the UK GDPR recognise this so we apply a legal basis called ‘public tasks.’ Public tasks covers the use of personal data where it relates to either being in the interest of the patients care or the public interest. This means that we do not need to ask for your consent, although we are obliged to be open and transparent with your personal data which we do via our Privacy Notice (insert link).

We certainly will not sell your personal data to anyone.

When we share your personal data we need to abide by the UK GDPR principles, one of which is called ‘data minimisation’ – this means we can legally only share what is relevant and necessary for the task.

Finally along with completing the DSPT (as mentioned above) where we have any data protection concerns or need advice we have a dedicated Information Governance team who are on hand to guide us through the do’s and don’ts.

I hope this information has provided you with assurance that we take the necessary steps to make sure your personal data is safe when in our care and that where we share your personal data we do so only if the law allows us to.

Thank you

Don’t let embarrassment stop you from getting your cervical smear test!

This Cervical Cancer Prevention week don’t let embarrassment stop you from getting your cervical smear test!

Cervical screening prevents 75% of cervical cancers from developing, yet one in four of those invited for a screening in the UK, don’t attend.

Cervical Screening is the method of detecting abnormal cells on the cervix. Being screened regularly means any abnormal changes in the cells can be identified and, if necessary treated to stop cancer developing.

All women and people with a cervix in the UK aged 25 to 49 are invited for a screening test every three years and those aged 50 to 64 are invited every five years.

What happens when you go for your cervical screening?

The screening test usually takes around 5 minutes to carry out.

You’ll be asked to undress from the waist down and lie on a couch, although you can remain fully dressed if you are wearing a loose skirt/dress.

The nurse or doctor will gently put an instrument called a speculum into your vagina, this holds the walls of the vagina open so the cervix can be seen.

The nurse or doctor will then use a small soft brush to gently collect some cells from the surface of your cervix. Although the procedure can be a little uncomfortable, it shouldn’t be painful. However, if you do find it painful let the doctor or nurse know as they may be able to reduce your discomfort.

Once the sample is taken, the doctor or nurse will close the curtain allowing you to dress whilst they prepare the sample to be sent off to the laboratory.

The cell sample is then sent off to a laboratory for analysis and you should receive the result within 2 weeks.

Many are nervous and embarrassed about the process of cervical screening, but there is no need to be, nurses and doctors carry out these tests every day. You are also welcome to bring a chaperone to your appointment if this would make you more comfortable.

More information about cervical screening can be found at:
NHS.UK
Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust

It’s Diabetes Awareness Week!

This week is Diabetes Awareness Week.

Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person’s blood sugar level to become too high.

There are 2 main types of diabetes

  • Type 1 – Where the body’s immune system attacks and destroys the cells that produce insulin.
  • Type 2 – Where the body does not produce enough insulin, or the body’s cells do not react to insulin.

Type 2 diabetes is far more common than type 2. In the UK, around 90% of all adults with diabetes have type 2.

Its very important for diabetes to be diagnosed as early as possible because it will get progressively worse if left untreated.

When to see a doctor

Speak to your GP if you experience the main symptoms of diabetes which includes:

  • feeling very thirsty
  • peeing more frequently than usual, particularly at night
  • feeling very tired
  • weight loss and loss of muscle bulk
  • itching around the penis or vagina, or frequent episodes of thrush
  • cuts or wounds that heal slowly
  • blurred vision

You can find diabetes advice and support at:

NHS.UK

Diabetes UK

Make your choice

Find information about opting out of sharing your data with the NHS and what you need to know:

Make your choice about sharing data from your health records – NHS (www.nhs.uk).